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Husk Settles Wrongful-Death Lawsuit

Husk Settles Wrongful-Death Lawsuit


The esteemed Charleston restaurant agrees to settle for $1.1 million

The parent company of Husk Restaurant in Charleston, S.C., Neighborhood Dining Group has agreed to settle the wrongful death lawsuit brought by the family of a man killed in a car crash last winter.

According to reports, the fatal event took place the morning of December 17, 2011, when police say Quentin Gregory Miller, 32, was driving over the Arthur Ravenel Jr. Bridge and was struck from behind, forcing his Mustang to crash into a concrete wall and burst into flames. The driver of the Audi that reportedly hit Miller’s car was Adam Joseph Burnell, 32, an assistant manager and sommelier at Husk at the time who was charged with felony drinking under the influence.

With regards to the wrongful death suit, plaintiffs alleged that the restaurant allowed Burnell to drink heavily after finishing his shift, and then drive home while impaired. The settlement requires The Neighborhood Dining Group (on behalf of Husk) to pay $1.1 million to the victim’s family.


Restaurant Settles Wrongful Death Suit

The owners of a nationally known downtown Charleston restaurant have agreed to pay a $1.1 million to settle a wrongful death lawsuit relating to a 2011 fiery car crash that killed a Mount Pleasant man.

The case stems from an early morning crash in December 2011 on the Arthur Ravenel Bridge in which Quentin Gregory Miller was killed. Police, and Miller's family, allege Adam Joseph Burnell, a Husk manager, was driving drunk when he lost control of his vehicle and struck Miller's Ford Mustang.

The fiery crash trapped Miller inside his car and burned him alive,

The family filed the lawsuit in March alleging someone at Husk should have stopped Burnell from driving home after he and other employees drank for free in the restaurant's bar, court records indicate. The settlement offer is not final until a court hearing later this week.

The Neighborhood Dining Group, Husk's owners, and its insurance company Peerless Indemnity Insurance Company have agreed to pay the settlement to Miller's parents and his common-law wife rather than going forward with a trial, federal court records indicate.

Less attorney's fees, the victim's heirs will receive about $610,000, according to U.S. District Court records. Burnell, who was not named as a defendant in the lawsuit, still faces felony DUI charges relating to the crash. He's free on a $50,000 bond while the case moves through court.

Husk rose to national prominence in It's known for serving locally grown and farm-raised fare.


Restaurant Settles Wrongful Death Suit

The owners of a nationally known downtown Charleston restaurant have agreed to pay a $1.1 million to settle a wrongful death lawsuit relating to a 2011 fiery car crash that killed a Mount Pleasant man.

The case stems from an early morning crash in December 2011 on the Arthur Ravenel Bridge in which Quentin Gregory Miller was killed. Police, and Miller's family, allege Adam Joseph Burnell, a Husk manager, was driving drunk when he lost control of his vehicle and struck Miller's Ford Mustang.

The fiery crash trapped Miller inside his car and burned him alive,

The family filed the lawsuit in March alleging someone at Husk should have stopped Burnell from driving home after he and other employees drank for free in the restaurant's bar, court records indicate. The settlement offer is not final until a court hearing later this week.

The Neighborhood Dining Group, Husk's owners, and its insurance company Peerless Indemnity Insurance Company have agreed to pay the settlement to Miller's parents and his common-law wife rather than going forward with a trial, federal court records indicate.

Less attorney's fees, the victim's heirs will receive about $610,000, according to U.S. District Court records. Burnell, who was not named as a defendant in the lawsuit, still faces felony DUI charges relating to the crash. He's free on a $50,000 bond while the case moves through court.

Husk rose to national prominence in It's known for serving locally grown and farm-raised fare.


Restaurant Settles Wrongful Death Suit

The owners of a nationally known downtown Charleston restaurant have agreed to pay a $1.1 million to settle a wrongful death lawsuit relating to a 2011 fiery car crash that killed a Mount Pleasant man.

The case stems from an early morning crash in December 2011 on the Arthur Ravenel Bridge in which Quentin Gregory Miller was killed. Police, and Miller's family, allege Adam Joseph Burnell, a Husk manager, was driving drunk when he lost control of his vehicle and struck Miller's Ford Mustang.

The fiery crash trapped Miller inside his car and burned him alive,

The family filed the lawsuit in March alleging someone at Husk should have stopped Burnell from driving home after he and other employees drank for free in the restaurant's bar, court records indicate. The settlement offer is not final until a court hearing later this week.

The Neighborhood Dining Group, Husk's owners, and its insurance company Peerless Indemnity Insurance Company have agreed to pay the settlement to Miller's parents and his common-law wife rather than going forward with a trial, federal court records indicate.

Less attorney's fees, the victim's heirs will receive about $610,000, according to U.S. District Court records. Burnell, who was not named as a defendant in the lawsuit, still faces felony DUI charges relating to the crash. He's free on a $50,000 bond while the case moves through court.

Husk rose to national prominence in It's known for serving locally grown and farm-raised fare.


Restaurant Settles Wrongful Death Suit

The owners of a nationally known downtown Charleston restaurant have agreed to pay a $1.1 million to settle a wrongful death lawsuit relating to a 2011 fiery car crash that killed a Mount Pleasant man.

The case stems from an early morning crash in December 2011 on the Arthur Ravenel Bridge in which Quentin Gregory Miller was killed. Police, and Miller's family, allege Adam Joseph Burnell, a Husk manager, was driving drunk when he lost control of his vehicle and struck Miller's Ford Mustang.

The fiery crash trapped Miller inside his car and burned him alive,

The family filed the lawsuit in March alleging someone at Husk should have stopped Burnell from driving home after he and other employees drank for free in the restaurant's bar, court records indicate. The settlement offer is not final until a court hearing later this week.

The Neighborhood Dining Group, Husk's owners, and its insurance company Peerless Indemnity Insurance Company have agreed to pay the settlement to Miller's parents and his common-law wife rather than going forward with a trial, federal court records indicate.

Less attorney's fees, the victim's heirs will receive about $610,000, according to U.S. District Court records. Burnell, who was not named as a defendant in the lawsuit, still faces felony DUI charges relating to the crash. He's free on a $50,000 bond while the case moves through court.

Husk rose to national prominence in It's known for serving locally grown and farm-raised fare.


Restaurant Settles Wrongful Death Suit

The owners of a nationally known downtown Charleston restaurant have agreed to pay a $1.1 million to settle a wrongful death lawsuit relating to a 2011 fiery car crash that killed a Mount Pleasant man.

The case stems from an early morning crash in December 2011 on the Arthur Ravenel Bridge in which Quentin Gregory Miller was killed. Police, and Miller's family, allege Adam Joseph Burnell, a Husk manager, was driving drunk when he lost control of his vehicle and struck Miller's Ford Mustang.

The fiery crash trapped Miller inside his car and burned him alive,

The family filed the lawsuit in March alleging someone at Husk should have stopped Burnell from driving home after he and other employees drank for free in the restaurant's bar, court records indicate. The settlement offer is not final until a court hearing later this week.

The Neighborhood Dining Group, Husk's owners, and its insurance company Peerless Indemnity Insurance Company have agreed to pay the settlement to Miller's parents and his common-law wife rather than going forward with a trial, federal court records indicate.

Less attorney's fees, the victim's heirs will receive about $610,000, according to U.S. District Court records. Burnell, who was not named as a defendant in the lawsuit, still faces felony DUI charges relating to the crash. He's free on a $50,000 bond while the case moves through court.

Husk rose to national prominence in It's known for serving locally grown and farm-raised fare.


Restaurant Settles Wrongful Death Suit

The owners of a nationally known downtown Charleston restaurant have agreed to pay a $1.1 million to settle a wrongful death lawsuit relating to a 2011 fiery car crash that killed a Mount Pleasant man.

The case stems from an early morning crash in December 2011 on the Arthur Ravenel Bridge in which Quentin Gregory Miller was killed. Police, and Miller's family, allege Adam Joseph Burnell, a Husk manager, was driving drunk when he lost control of his vehicle and struck Miller's Ford Mustang.

The fiery crash trapped Miller inside his car and burned him alive,

The family filed the lawsuit in March alleging someone at Husk should have stopped Burnell from driving home after he and other employees drank for free in the restaurant's bar, court records indicate. The settlement offer is not final until a court hearing later this week.

The Neighborhood Dining Group, Husk's owners, and its insurance company Peerless Indemnity Insurance Company have agreed to pay the settlement to Miller's parents and his common-law wife rather than going forward with a trial, federal court records indicate.

Less attorney's fees, the victim's heirs will receive about $610,000, according to U.S. District Court records. Burnell, who was not named as a defendant in the lawsuit, still faces felony DUI charges relating to the crash. He's free on a $50,000 bond while the case moves through court.

Husk rose to national prominence in It's known for serving locally grown and farm-raised fare.


Restaurant Settles Wrongful Death Suit

The owners of a nationally known downtown Charleston restaurant have agreed to pay a $1.1 million to settle a wrongful death lawsuit relating to a 2011 fiery car crash that killed a Mount Pleasant man.

The case stems from an early morning crash in December 2011 on the Arthur Ravenel Bridge in which Quentin Gregory Miller was killed. Police, and Miller's family, allege Adam Joseph Burnell, a Husk manager, was driving drunk when he lost control of his vehicle and struck Miller's Ford Mustang.

The fiery crash trapped Miller inside his car and burned him alive,

The family filed the lawsuit in March alleging someone at Husk should have stopped Burnell from driving home after he and other employees drank for free in the restaurant's bar, court records indicate. The settlement offer is not final until a court hearing later this week.

The Neighborhood Dining Group, Husk's owners, and its insurance company Peerless Indemnity Insurance Company have agreed to pay the settlement to Miller's parents and his common-law wife rather than going forward with a trial, federal court records indicate.

Less attorney's fees, the victim's heirs will receive about $610,000, according to U.S. District Court records. Burnell, who was not named as a defendant in the lawsuit, still faces felony DUI charges relating to the crash. He's free on a $50,000 bond while the case moves through court.

Husk rose to national prominence in It's known for serving locally grown and farm-raised fare.


Restaurant Settles Wrongful Death Suit

The owners of a nationally known downtown Charleston restaurant have agreed to pay a $1.1 million to settle a wrongful death lawsuit relating to a 2011 fiery car crash that killed a Mount Pleasant man.

The case stems from an early morning crash in December 2011 on the Arthur Ravenel Bridge in which Quentin Gregory Miller was killed. Police, and Miller's family, allege Adam Joseph Burnell, a Husk manager, was driving drunk when he lost control of his vehicle and struck Miller's Ford Mustang.

The fiery crash trapped Miller inside his car and burned him alive,

The family filed the lawsuit in March alleging someone at Husk should have stopped Burnell from driving home after he and other employees drank for free in the restaurant's bar, court records indicate. The settlement offer is not final until a court hearing later this week.

The Neighborhood Dining Group, Husk's owners, and its insurance company Peerless Indemnity Insurance Company have agreed to pay the settlement to Miller's parents and his common-law wife rather than going forward with a trial, federal court records indicate.

Less attorney's fees, the victim's heirs will receive about $610,000, according to U.S. District Court records. Burnell, who was not named as a defendant in the lawsuit, still faces felony DUI charges relating to the crash. He's free on a $50,000 bond while the case moves through court.

Husk rose to national prominence in It's known for serving locally grown and farm-raised fare.


Restaurant Settles Wrongful Death Suit

The owners of a nationally known downtown Charleston restaurant have agreed to pay a $1.1 million to settle a wrongful death lawsuit relating to a 2011 fiery car crash that killed a Mount Pleasant man.

The case stems from an early morning crash in December 2011 on the Arthur Ravenel Bridge in which Quentin Gregory Miller was killed. Police, and Miller's family, allege Adam Joseph Burnell, a Husk manager, was driving drunk when he lost control of his vehicle and struck Miller's Ford Mustang.

The fiery crash trapped Miller inside his car and burned him alive,

The family filed the lawsuit in March alleging someone at Husk should have stopped Burnell from driving home after he and other employees drank for free in the restaurant's bar, court records indicate. The settlement offer is not final until a court hearing later this week.

The Neighborhood Dining Group, Husk's owners, and its insurance company Peerless Indemnity Insurance Company have agreed to pay the settlement to Miller's parents and his common-law wife rather than going forward with a trial, federal court records indicate.

Less attorney's fees, the victim's heirs will receive about $610,000, according to U.S. District Court records. Burnell, who was not named as a defendant in the lawsuit, still faces felony DUI charges relating to the crash. He's free on a $50,000 bond while the case moves through court.

Husk rose to national prominence in It's known for serving locally grown and farm-raised fare.


Restaurant Settles Wrongful Death Suit

The owners of a nationally known downtown Charleston restaurant have agreed to pay a $1.1 million to settle a wrongful death lawsuit relating to a 2011 fiery car crash that killed a Mount Pleasant man.

The case stems from an early morning crash in December 2011 on the Arthur Ravenel Bridge in which Quentin Gregory Miller was killed. Police, and Miller's family, allege Adam Joseph Burnell, a Husk manager, was driving drunk when he lost control of his vehicle and struck Miller's Ford Mustang.

The fiery crash trapped Miller inside his car and burned him alive,

The family filed the lawsuit in March alleging someone at Husk should have stopped Burnell from driving home after he and other employees drank for free in the restaurant's bar, court records indicate. The settlement offer is not final until a court hearing later this week.

The Neighborhood Dining Group, Husk's owners, and its insurance company Peerless Indemnity Insurance Company have agreed to pay the settlement to Miller's parents and his common-law wife rather than going forward with a trial, federal court records indicate.

Less attorney's fees, the victim's heirs will receive about $610,000, according to U.S. District Court records. Burnell, who was not named as a defendant in the lawsuit, still faces felony DUI charges relating to the crash. He's free on a $50,000 bond while the case moves through court.

Husk rose to national prominence in It's known for serving locally grown and farm-raised fare.


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